Don’t Read This!

12

There are many texts and researches done by anthropologists, archeologists, linguists, ethnographist and explorers on the origins, cultures and life of the Dayaks. Scattered across multiples volumes and fragmented, comphrehensive and up to date information on the life and times of these people are hard to come by, if not outdated. Research by the local authorities seem to grind to a halt, with not much new findings published.

This is my attempt at compiling necessary information regarding the Dayak’s origin, life, culture, evolution, migration, song, stories and history online, as accurate and comprehensive as I can without sounding boring. The new generation don’t go to libraries anymore. The old, who somewhat cares, just don’t know how to maintain a proper website, let alone open Facebook. And access to archives with extensive information on Bornean culture is restricted to scholars and researchers. So I want to put up these informations at the fingertips of our new generation of Dayaks and remind them that they have a beautiful, intricate and old culture other than drinking and eating pork. And perhaps to teach some of our western neighbours a thing or two about Dayaks.

Yes, we drive wooden cars powered by water.

What do I get from this?

Knowledge at least. Culture has always interested me. And there isn’t much digital data to be found regarding these things. Most of them are still stuck in books. Generation X and Y are mostly uninterested in these things, but perhaps, with a little nudge, they might just be.

Maybe one day, we can resurrect and maintain these dying traditions, and remember who we are.

Culture would seem … first and foremost, to be the knowledge of what makes man something other than and accident of the universebe it by deepening his harmony with the world, or by the lucid consciousness of his revolt from it. … Culture is the sum of all the forms of art, of love and of thought, which, in the course of centuries, have enabled man to be less enslaved.

~ André Malraux, quoted in Malraux : An essay in Political Criticism‎ (1967) by David O. Wilkinson

## UPDATE

I would like to extend the resources and information to also include Brunei, Sabah and Kalimantan. So if anyone has any thing to contribute or to add and rectify, please let me know. Thanks!

One comment

  1. i have doubt on the Kayan. I read from Chinese version stated that the Kayan had long ago established their Kingdom along the river of Kayan River in the year 1300.They made tributes to the Tang Dynasty as written in the Book of “LiangZhu or 梁書”。
    But now you are saying the Bisaya was the tribe, indeed .I m confused.

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