Damming our Future: The Borneo Project

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I am not anti-progress. I just hope for a more sustainable development. Sustainable development that does not destroy the heritage, livelihood and culture of the Bornean people.

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An area estimated at 1/5 of Sarawak would be underwater once the 12 mega dams are built. Above is the picture of the area that will be submerged, and major archaeological and cultural sites drowned underneath methane releasing waters.

The infamous Bakun Dam dispaced 9,000 people, while plans for undersea HVDC cables to Peninsular Malaysia has been scrapped due to high costs and geographical concerns. Which means the Bakun Dam is not running at full capacity.

The Murum Dam will be complete soon and begin operation by 2015, displacing 2,000 people.

The Baram Dam is in the midst of construction, and will displace 20,00 people in the Kenyah and Kayan heartland.

Meanwhile, another nine more will be built.

These are the facts. You make your own judgements.

Damming Our Future from The Borneo Project on Vimeo.

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An earnest request

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When I first started this blog, my dream was to write what I know about my culture and heritage for the world to read.

Now, I write because I feel a responsibility to disseminate largely hidden information that are usually tucked between the dusty sheets of science journals and scholar gazettes.

I’ve always wondered why are there so much information, yet most of it is inaccessible to the curious public? I’ve always thought the purpose of all these researches is so that laymen, like you and me, can learn more about who and what we are, and what will become of us.

It’s sad that the majority will never know, and most of what is found will probably never see the light of day.

Dig.

Rifle.

Scour.

Seek.

And the truth will set you free.

Let everyone know, start a blog, post it on your Facebook, but let’s learn about our dying culture together and be proud of this beautiful, fiery culture that carried our ancestors through aeons.

It’s our land, our life, our love.

Sincerely,

The Author

Updates

I would like to thank all my dear readers for their visits and their comments on this blog. I haven’t had the time or material to add much material to my blog nowadays. I do recommend some of the links on my blogroll, especially a fellow Bornean blogger Paren (http://www.parenbonjour.com/). I hope this blog will be more active in the future. For now, just browse through the archives and leave any comments if you have any questions or opinions. REMINDER: For those of you who criticize the things I’ve posted up as being inaccurate or biased or presumptuous, please be reminded that you can leave a comment politely and tell me what’s wrong. Some people only know how to criticize but offer no constructive solution. If you’re that awesome, go and research, interview, photograph and write/blog yourself. You think I Wikipedia it all? Wiki don’t have half as much as I have in here. Add more info or experiences, it’ll be much appreciated. Thanks!

Emperor of Indonesia?

A Tanjung Malim-born Dutch citizen claims he is a descendent of the Emperor of China and that his bloodline is linked to royal families in India, Java and Siam.

On Saturday morning, at a Kuala Lumpur hotel coffee house together with two of Kamal’s aides, I waited for the so-called trillionaire.

Wearing a baseball cap, long-sleeved shirt and jeans, he sauntered over to our table. The two aides bowed, pressed their palms together to their forehead as if greeting royalty and kissed his hands.

“We call him Tuanku as he is a sultan from Indonesia,” one of the aides whispered to me.

The money trail: Kamal with a document which he claims proves that he is a trillionaire.
According to Kamal, he is a Dutch citizen born in Tanjung Malim, Perak, on Jan 1, 1964.

“I’m a descendent of the Emperor of China and in a history that went haywire, my family fled from China to Kedah. I traced my bloodline to the royal families of China, India, Java and Siam,” claimed the man who is also known as Raden Mas Prabhu Gusti Agung Ki Asmoro Wijoyo.

“I grew up in Tanjung Malim and my family here is very simple and ordinary. Nobody in my family talks about our royal blood and wealth. But my grandmother once told me: “You are special and, when the time comes, you will know.”

It was in Holland in the late 1980s that Kamal “found out who he really was”. A member of an Indonesian royal family, kicked out of the country by president Sukarno, told him he was of royal blood.

In London in the early 1990s, a lawyer told Kamal about his royal family’s massive wealth. Unconvinced, he told the lawyer to prove his claims.

He and the lawyer flew from London to Hong Kong to meet the “keeper of the royal treasure”. From there, Kamal and the keeper travelled to Kunming in China.

They hiked up a mountain for four hours and reached a cave guarded by an old couple who, Kamal says, are immortals.

“If you tried to pass them without their blessing, you would cough blood and die,” he said.

Inside the three-metre-high cave, Kamal saw gold bars stacked like a pagoda, US$15mil (RM46mil) in jade and US$10mil (RM31mil) in diamonds and stacks of US dollars.

“I took a gold bar and knocked it on a rock. It was really gold. The treasure is the wealth of the dynasties that ruled China. Their wealth was also kept in other mountains and in vaults all over the world,” he said.

About three years ago, when Kamal watched Nicholas Cage’s movie National Treasure, he laughed.

“The treasure in the movie was small compared to the wealth I saw in the mountain,” he said.

Next, Kamal told of his meeting two years ago in Kuala Lumpur with Dr Wong Eng Po, a royal physician from China.

Dr Wong placed his hand on Kamal’s bald head, then immediately bowed in front of Kamal and ordered his five followers to do the same.

“He said I was the reincarnation of Emperor Nurhaci (1661-1626) of China. He felt an energy on my head which was superhuman because an emperor, unlike an ordinary human, has to think more.

“I’m the reincarnation of two emperors of China,” Kamal added.

He elaborated that a few years ago, the royal family decided he would be the sole administrator of the royal wealth kept in secret accounts in about 1,000 banks worldwide.

“This means that 86.7% of the world’s money belongs to me,” he said.

Taking out several folders, Kamal said: “You’re lucky, I brought documents.”

He produced an A4-sized paper with the photographs of the national treasure, the immortal couple and several “official-looking” letters allegedly from HSBC certifying he has an account of five trillion euros (RM20tril).

“That is a small amount. I have more money in other banks and institutions,” he added.

I wondered why his name has not appeared in the Forbes’ list of world’s richest people. And a suspicion lingered about his claims.

However, I could not authenticate his documents since the bank was closed for Chinese New Year.

Kamal has not made any withdrawal from the account as “it is not money that you can move just like that”.

“The money is under the control of Indonesia, Germany, Britain, the US and the Euro Central Bank and I’ve got to go smooth with them,” he said.

“I can’t use the money directly but I will invest in certain projects. Like three trillion euros (RM12tril) to green a desert in China.”

Curious, I asked what was the difference between a billionaire and a trillionaire.

He replied: “A billionaire needs to show he has the money. But for me, I don’t need to show that I got money. I can travel in a bus. I can wear slippers.”

Born in the year of the dragon, Kamal believes 2012 is his year. In March, he says he will negotiate with institutions such as the IMF to be recognised as the Emperor of Indonesia.

He says he’s rich. But his story could just be as rich.

Let’s hope he is not another Elie Youssef Najem, the so-called Lebanese billionaire who made headlines for all the wrong reasons.

~The Star (Jan 26 2012)